The island's economy is driven almost solely by tourism. Several resorts have been built on motu (small islands, from Tahitian) surrounding the lagoon. Hotel Bora Bora opened in 1961, and nine years later built the first over-the-water bungalows on stilts over the lagoon.[10] Today, over-water bungalows are a standard feature of most Bora Bora resorts. The quality of those bungalows ranges from comparably cheap, basic accommodations to very luxurious and expensive.
Overwater bungalows were first invented in the South Pacific (in Moorea, off Tahiti, to be specific), and this is still the premiere destination for overwater resorts. But if you aren't close to the South Pacific then you should probably also consider the Maldives. Water villas in the Maldives, as they are called there, can be found at over 80 different resorts. This string of islands just south of India has most of the world's water bungalows, and as a result they also have the most competition and the best value.
The island is 45 km (28 mi) across at its widest point and covers an area of 1,045 km2 (403 sq mi). The highest peak is Mont Orohena (Mou'a 'Orohena) (2,241 m (7,352 ft)). Mount Roonui, or Mount Ronui (Mou'a Rōnui), in the southeast rises to 1,332 m (4,370 ft). The island consists of two roughly round portions centred on volcanic mountains and connected by a short isthmus named after the small town of Taravao which is situated there.[citation needed]
The inevitable love affair with this island begins right before you touch down. The view from the plane window is a moment you will not soon forget. Have your camera in hand as you begin your descent and prepare for the moment when iconic Mount Otemanu comes into view. From that point on, each experience will only continue to exceed even your highest expectations.
In 1946, Tahiti and the whole of French Polynesia became an overseas territory (Territoire d'outre-mer). Tahitians were granted French citizenship, a right that had been campaigned for by nationalist leader Pouvanaa a Oopa for many years.[36] In 2003, French Polynesia's status was changed to that of an overseas collectivity (Collectivité d'outre-mer) and in 2004 it was declared an overseas country (pays d'outre-mer or POM).
The wonderful thing about Bora Bora is that you can be as active or inactive as you wish to be. Should you decide to venture away from the resort, you can visit the main village of Vaitape and shop at the local boutiques or dine at one of Bora Bora's restaurants including Mai Kai Bora Bora, or the legendary Bloody Mary's. You can also explore Mount Pahia and Mount Otemanu on a guided hike or Jeep Safari tour.
Huahine casts a spell over you from the moment you arrive. Only a 40-minute flight from the island of Tahiti, the enchanted Huahine, with its lush forests, untamed landscape and quaint villages, is one of Tahiti’s best-kept secrets, a place where you can live like a local. A deep, crystal-clear lagoon surrounds the two islands that comprise Huahine, while magnificent bays and white-sand beaches add drama to the experience. Relatively unchanged by the modern world, Huahine offers the slower, more tranquil pace of old Polynesia. With only eight small villages scattered across the island, the few residents welcome visitors with great kindness. Not surprisingly, this fertile world offers a rich soil providing the local farmers a bountiful harvest of vanilla, melons and bananas. 

In a surprise result, Oscar Temaru's pro-independence progressive coalition, Union for Democracy, formed a government with a one-seat majority in the 57-seat parliament, defeating the conservative party, Tahoera'a Huiraatira, led by Gaston Flosse. On 8 October 2004, Flosse succeeded in passing a censure motion against the government, provoking a crisis. A controversy is whether the national government of France should use its power to call for new elections in a local government in case of a political crisis.

The inevitable love affair with this island begins right before you touch down. The view from the plane window is a moment you will not soon forget. Have your camera in hand as you begin your descent and prepare for the moment when iconic Mount Otemanu comes into view. From that point on, each experience will only continue to exceed even your highest expectations.
Within the framework of this treaty, France recognised the sovereignty of the Tahitian state. The Queen was responsible for internal affairs, while France would deal with foreign relations and assure the defence of Tahiti, as well as maintain order on the island. Once the treaty had been signed there began a struggle for influence between the English Protestants and the Catholic representatives of France. During the first years of the Protectorate, the Protestants managed to retain a considerable hold over Tahitian society, thanks to their knowledge of the country and its language. George Pritchard had been away at the time. He returned however to work towards indoctrinating the locals against the Roman Catholic French.
The commune of Bora-Bora is made up of the island of Bora Bora proper with its surrounding islets emerging from the coral reef, 29.3 km2 (11.3 sq mi) in total. The surrounding islets include Motu Tapu, Motu Ahuna, Tevairoa, Motu Tane, Motu Mute, Motu Tufari, Motu Tehotu, Motu Pitiaau, Sofitel Motu, Motu Toopua, and Toopuaiti. The commune also includes the Tūpai atoll. (11 km2 or 4.2 sq mi), located 20 kilometres (12 mi) north of Bora Bora. The atoll of Tūpai has no permanent population apart from about 50 workers in the coconut plantations.
Portuguese navigator Pedro Fernandes de Queirós, serving the Spanish Crown in an expedition to Terra Australis, was perhaps the first European to set eyes on the island of Tahiti. He sighted an inhabited island on 10 February 1606[12] which he called Sagitaria (or Sagittaria). However, whether the island that he saw was actually Tahiti or not has not been fully ascertained. It has been suggested that he actually saw the island of Rekareka to the south-east of Tahiti.[13] According to other authors the first European to arrive in Tahiti was Spanish explorer Juan Fernández in his expedition of 1576–1577.[14]

In July, the Heivā festival in Papeete celebrates Polynesian culture and the commemoration of the storming of the Bastille in Paris. After the establishment of the CEP (Centre d'Experimentation du Pacifique) in 1963, the standard of living in French Polynesia increased considerably and many Polynesians abandoned traditional activities and emigrated to the urban centre of Pape'ete. Even though the standard of living is elevated (due mainly to French foreign direct investment), the economy is reliant on imports. At the cessation of CEP activities, France signed the Progress Pact with Tahiti to compensate the loss of financial resources and assist in education and tourism with an investment of about US$150 million a year from the beginning of 2006.


If you work half way around the globe with a time difference of 11 hours you need to make sure that your partner on the other side is spot on, professional and efficient. We are very proud that Tahiti Nui Travel represents us in French Polynesia. The effort we put into our itineraries is continued by Tahiti Nui Travel with the service and friendliness to our clients. Thank you for taking such good care and helping us with such a good service ….!!!! 

In July, the Heivā festival in Papeete celebrates Polynesian culture and the commemoration of the storming of the Bastille in Paris. After the establishment of the CEP (Centre d'Experimentation du Pacifique) in 1963, the standard of living in French Polynesia increased considerably and many Polynesians abandoned traditional activities and emigrated to the urban centre of Pape'ete. Even though the standard of living is elevated (due mainly to French foreign direct investment), the economy is reliant on imports. At the cessation of CEP activities, France signed the Progress Pact with Tahiti to compensate the loss of financial resources and assist in education and tourism with an investment of about US$150 million a year from the beginning of 2006.
Feeling creative? Journey through the expressive side of Huahine life and discover the fine artistry of Melanie Shook Dupre. Inspired by the surrounding lush Polynesian landscapes and lifestyles for over 39 years, Melanie gracefully captivates island life through her paintings and portraits. A true visual charm, "Galerie 'Umatatea", located in Maeva, Huahine is a must see. 
Mystical, captivating and alluring, Huahine is admittedly one of our favorite islands in French Polynesia. It's usually a popular choice among repeat visitors who have already seen Moorea or Bora Bora and now seek a new experience. Regardless, first timers will love the welcoming hospitality of the locals and the absolute serenity of the island's natural surroundings. 

The Tahitians believed in the afterlife, a paradise called Rohutu-no'ano'a. When a Tahitian died, the barkcloth wrapped corpse was placed on a funeral bier, fare tupapa 'u, which was a raised canoe awning on posts surrounded by bamboo. Food for the gods was placed nearby to prevent them from eating the body, which would condemn the spirit to the underworld. Mourners would slash themselves with shark's teeth and the blood smeared on barkcloth placed nearby. Most importantly, the Chief Mourner, donned the parae, an elaborate costume composed of an iridescent mask made of four polished pearl shell discs. One disk was black signifying Po, the spirit world, while one was white, signifying Ao, the world of people. A crown of red feathers signified 'Oro. A curved wooden board, pautu, below the mask contained five polished pearl shells, which signified Hina, the moon goddess. Hanging below were more shells in rows, ahu-parau, signifying the Pleiades, considered to be the eyes of former chiefs. Finally, a ceremonial garment, tiputa, covered the body and was decorated with an apron of polished coconut shells, ahu-'aipu.[11]:151-152,177-179,308
"Tahiti" is a common name for French Polynesia, a country consisting of the 118 islands in the South Pacific. It's also a name of the island with this group. Bora Bora, Tahiti and Moorea are the most popular islands in French Polynesia, yet every island offers a multitude of possibilities: a dive in Rangiroa, a hike in Moorea, an encounter with manta rays in Bora Bora, a swim in Tahiti's waterfalls or a chance to enjoy Polynesian culture in Raiatea ...
Four Seasons Resort Bora Bora charges no additional fee for children 17 years of age and younger occupying the same guest room as their parents or guardians (space permitting). Special rates may be available for two adults and two children 17 years of age and younger occupying two rooms, subject to availability. Guests aged 12 and under are considered children. Guests aged 13 to 17 are considered young adults. Guests aged 18 or older are considered adults. A third adult (18 years of age or older) staying in the same room with two other adults, regardless of maximum occupancy, will be charged an additional fee per night, plus applicable taxes, service charges and fees. City tax on guest rooms applies to children aged 12 and older (children under the age of 12 are exempt from the city tax). For reservations and information, please contact the Hotel directly.
Mystical, captivating and alluring, Huahine is admittedly one of our favorite islands in French Polynesia. It's usually a popular choice among repeat visitors who have already seen Moorea or Bora Bora and now seek a new experience. Regardless, first timers will love the welcoming hospitality of the locals and the absolute serenity of the island's natural surroundings.
A trip to Bora Bora and Tahiti is your ticket to discover a new and colorful world. Lush green mountains, crystal clear lagoons and romantic overwater bungalows are awaiting you in this idyllic part of the world. Just looking at the images of Bora Bora makes you want to leave everything behind and fully immerse in this world of beauty and tranquility. It's no surprise Tahiti is a bucket list destination for many people, and a honeymoon in Bora Bora is the dream of many brides and grooms.

Before the arrival of the Europeans the island was divided into different chiefdoms, very precise territories dominated by a single clan. These chiefdoms were linked to each other by allegiances based on the blood ties of their leaders and on their power in war. The most important clan on the island was the Teva,[9] whose territory extended from the peninsula in the south of Tahiti Nui. The Teva Clan was composed of the Teva i Uta (Teva of the Interior) and the Teva i Tai (Teva of the Sea), and was led by Amo and Purea.[10]
Tahiti (/təˈhiːti/; French pronunciation: ​[ta.iti]; previously also known as Otaheite (obsolete)) is the largest island in the Windward group of French Polynesia. The island is located in the archipelago of the Society Islands in the central Southern Pacific Ocean, and is divided into two parts: the bigger, northwestern part, Tahiti Nui, and the smaller, southeastern part, Tahiti Iti. The island was formed from volcanic activity and is high and mountainous with surrounding coral reefs. The population is 189,517 inhabitants (2017 census),[1] making it the most populous island of French Polynesia and accounting for 68.7% of its total population.
Cook and Banks circumnavigated the island from 26 June to 1 July. On the exploration, they met Ahio, chief of Ha'apaiano'o or Papenoo, Rita, chief of Hitia'a, Pahairro, chief of Pueu, Vehiatua, chief of Tautra, Matahiapo, chief of Teahupo'o, Tutea, chief of Vaira'o, and Moe, chief of Afa'Ahiti. In Papara, guided by Tupaia, they investigated the ruins of Mahaiatea marae, an impressive structure containing a stone pyramid or ahu, measuring 44 feet (13 m) high, 267 feet (81 m) long and 87 feet (27 m) wide. Cook and Endeavour departed Tahiti on 13 July 1769, taking Raiatean navigator Tupaia along for his geographic knowledge of the islands.[11]:149,186–202,205
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